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View Full Version : Anybody Familiar with Egg Harbor 33?



scoffshore
02-19-2009, 12:29 PM
OK, Ok, I know it isn't a shammie, but I have come across a pretty decent deal on a 1977 33' Egg Harbor. For my current lifestyle here in the northeast with my wife and kid, it seems like a great boat for us. Its all about the cabin space and the cockpit. Am looking at and tempted to buy another 26, but the size of the cabin just doesn't cut it. Anybody familiar with this particular model of Egg?

Andy B
02-19-2009, 03:52 PM
If it's the boat I'm thinking of it's one of the prettiest pocket sportys ever built. However, if it's a glass over wood boat, survey it VERY carefully. Those old Eggs and Pacemakers were known as rot makers.

Ship
02-19-2009, 04:06 PM
I had a friend who had what I thought was a 32' but the year is about right. Most of the Egg Harbor boats were high quality boats back then but don't expect good gas burns. They didn't care back then. Comfort is real good. Floating house is a close discription. The engines were whatever the buyer wanted, but at least the one I was on had Crusaders. I don't how big, but gas hogs. My brother-inlaw's dad was still doing the wood back then so I know that was pretty good. A lot depends on how well the boat was taken care of over the years. With fairly good care, they'll last forever. There was an old 1950s woody in the marina I was in 8 years ago and it was a thing to behold. Absolutely grorgous. The guy had inherited it from his dad and his dad bought it new. Eggs are a quality boat.

Hutch
02-19-2009, 04:13 PM
Very nice - I'd love something bigger to spend more time cruising and overnighting with the family, unfortunately its just not in the cards right now. There is what I think is a 33 in Mamaroneck, looks like a very nice boat.

Ship
02-19-2009, 04:19 PM
If it's the boat I'm thinking of it's one of the prettiest pocket sportys ever built. However, if it's a glass over wood boat, survey it VERY carefully. Those old Eggs and Pacemakers were known as rot makers.
Fresh water is a rot maker in any boat.(Cuprinol was a cure back in the days.) Don't let fresh water lay on or near almost any wood. Wood won't rot in salt water, then it's the bugs that eat it.
For the record- back when they were changing over from all wood boats to all glass boats, the hull was almost always glass and the super structure was glass on wood. Where ever the glass on wood is in any boat, it's a problem. It traps fresh water near the wood. A lesson we all need to be aware of:frown:

GREGK
02-19-2009, 04:24 PM
I think the hull is glass and the top is glass over wood(i believe it's mohagany).The wood working on the late 60's early 70's was just beautiful.Some were diesel but a lot were gassers chevy mostly.The hull line and outside wood trim around hull i think was also an option,That makes the boat look top notch.Wish you good luck.Post some picks!!

64connie
02-19-2009, 04:31 PM
Unless you have a hole full of money in the back yard, don't walk, run away. With my young family, I loved the cabin cruiser. But it was eating me alive- I'm just a working stiff, no trust fund here...a big boat just ain't worth it unless you have plenty of money to pour in it. If you have the $$, go for it!

stagalv
02-19-2009, 04:44 PM
Here is some more info on the boat and company.
*
I would guess this old boat would soak up alot of money. There are some great deals out there on much newer stuff. Let me know how much you would spend and I will make some recommendations.

scoffshore
02-19-2009, 04:44 PM
Yes, it is a glass hull with a wood structure, as are all of the Dyers I have been working on over the last several years. The chryslers are definately gas hogs, and would be slated for replacement over the next several years, but I'm not planning at this point to make the 100+ mile runs I used to at this point. Pretty much go from say Stamford to Greenwich, or Stamford to Oyster Bay, maybe once in a blue moon to Port Washington or Kings Point. Once in a lifetime actually down to the city to see the Statue of Liberty. Pretty much chill out at the dock or out on the hook for a weekend, or do some fishing overnight comfortably with the fam, but a lot of overnights.

Definately familiar with the wood and boats thing, I used to have a 42' Grand Banks that we thought about renaming Epoxy Girl.

Ship
02-19-2009, 04:56 PM
Yes, it is a glass hull with a wood structure, as are all of the Dyers I have been working on over the last several years. The chryslers are definately gas hogs, and would be slated for replacement over the next several years, but I'm not planning at this point to make the 100+ mile runs I used to at this point. Pretty much go from say Stamford to Greenwich, or Stamford to Oyster Bay, maybe once in a blue moon to Port Washington or Kings Point. Once in a lifetime actually down to the city to see the Statue of Liberty. Pretty much chill out at the dock or out on the hook for a weekend, or do some fishing overnight comfortably with the fam, but a lot of overnights.

Definately familiar with the wood and boats thing, I used to have a 42' Grand Banks that we thought about renaming Epoxy Girl.
For a weekend overnighter, you could do much worse. They're a good looking boat and with inhouse repairs should last a long time. "Gitt-rot" a wood boat owners best friend :biggrin::biggrin:

Andy B
02-19-2009, 05:48 PM
Fresh water is a rot maker in any boat.(Cuprinol was a cure back in the days.) Don't let fresh water lay on or near almost any wood. Wood won't rot in salt water, then it's the bugs that eat it.
For the record- back when they were changing over from all wood boats to all glass boats, the hull was almost always glass and the super structure was glass on wood. Where ever the glass on wood is in any boat, it's a problem. It traps fresh water near the wood. A lesson we all need to be aware of:frown:

Having specialized in rebuilding and restoring older wood boats to original construction specs for some years I'm well aware of the consequences of fresh water on wood. However, this generalization aside, Eggs and Paces are nortorious for rot in their corner posts, around the windshields, cabin sides, etc. Older wood Posts had a penchant for rotting out the insides of their transomes due to deck water leaking through. And my general observation is that even the finest custom wood boats, both power and sail, had problems. It's just the nature of the beast.

Ship
02-19-2009, 06:13 PM
Having specialized in rebuilding and restoring older wood boats to original construction specs for some years I'm well aware of the consequences of fresh water on wood. However, this generalization aside, Eggs and Paces are nortorious for rot in their corner posts, around the windshields, cabin sides, etc. Older wood Posts had a penchant for rotting out the insides of their transomes due to deck water leaking through. And my general observation is that even the finest custom wood boats, both power and sail, had problems. It's just the nature of the beast.
Would it be reasonable to say that poor maintance caused them to be sent to you? There were a lot of them built and a lot of them still on the water. Only a few other boats can say the same.

Andy B
02-19-2009, 06:51 PM
In some cases poor maintenance was the culprit but more ofter than not, just natural weathering and hull and deck flexing/working was the cause. And to be honest, I've NEVER seen a fiberglass hull with rot. Laminate separation yes, but rot no. I've also seen plenty with blisters on the bottom but even then, I can't recall one ever sinking because of blistering. And yes, salt water does preserve wood, but it sure plays hell with fasteners that let go when a plank springs and the boat takes a death dive to the bottom of Davey Jones locker.

Yes, there are a lot of old wood clunkers out there. Same can be said of the early fiberglass boats with hulls that are becomming scaringly brittle. I've owned a lot of wood boats, including an Alden Dolphin 47 ketch and a custom Chrisovitch 40 sportfish. And unless one comes my way that I just can't resist (even after psychiatric counseling including shock therapy and other drastic treatment), I'll hopefully never have another. I like to use my boats, not work on them.

Ship
02-19-2009, 07:02 PM
In some cases poor maintenance was the culprit but more ofter than not, just natural weathering and hull and deck flexing/working was the cause. And to be honest, I've NEVER seen a fiberglass hull with rot. Laminate separation yes, but rot no. I've also seen plenty with blisters on the bottom but even then, I can't recall one ever sinking because of blistering. And yes, salt water does preserve wood, but it sure plays hell with fasteners that let go when a plank springs and the boat takes a death dive to the bottom of Davey Jones locker.

Yes, there are a lot of old wood clunkers out there. Same can be said of the early fiberglass boats with hulls that are becomming scaringly brittle. I've owned a lot of wood boats, including an Alden Dolphin 47 ketch and a custom Chrisovitch 40 sportfish. And unless one comes my way that I just can't resist (even after psychiatric counseling including shock therapy and other drastic treatment), I'll hopefully never have another. I like to use my boats, not work on them.


Andy, all of what you said gets to the bottom line. You don't want a wooden boat. By the way. The blisters in fiberglass are a form of rot caused by water. The water desolves the organics in the resin and forms an acid which perpetuates and accelerates the process leaving glass fabric and nothing to hold it together. There have been cases where boats have gone down because of this malody. Each medium has it's problems, just different.

scoffshore
02-19-2009, 07:18 PM
stagalv, around 10k, interesting inof. I know all about the history of the brand, just not this particular model. Open to tons of recommendations.

Andy B
02-19-2009, 07:27 PM
Andy, all of what you said gets to the bottom line. You don't want a wooden boat. By the way. The blisters in fiberglass are a form of rot caused by water. The water desolves the organics in the resin and forms an acid which perpetuates and accelerates the process leaving glass fabric and nothing to hold it together. There have been cases where boats have gone down because of this malody. Each medium has it's problems, just different.

Blankendingy,
You didn't get my drift: I was one of the last wooden boat butchers in the business in the Daytona area and have seen plenty of different problems in both boats I've repaired and those I surveyed for banks and insurance companies (yeah, been there and done that too). In fact, I first helped my father build a wood boat in 1952 and have been going at it ever since. And there's nothing like the feel of a piece of well sanded and treated wood in my hands. And yes, water intruding into the laminate causes blisters and at its worse, separation which is what causes sinking (not blistering).

For wooden boat afficiandos that want to and are CAPABLE of working with wood, old wood boats are fine. However, for the 99.9% of the boating public that barely know the pointy end from the blunt end, wood boats are an anthema and are to be avoided at all costs, even for those that can well afford them. As I said, I'm at the point in my life where with what time I've got left, I want to spend it out in the boat and not laid up in some boatyard working on it.

Ship
02-19-2009, 07:35 PM
The Egg Harbor boat business is still operating and may still have the records from the previous owners. But call quick because things look grim again. They're located where Pacemaker was. Philadelphia Avenue, Egg Harbor City, NJ 08215. They're proud of their name and may be helpful. It's a shame that the economy has driven some good boat companies out of business. As the history of Egg Harbor Boats showed the south jersey area was the home of some great looking and running boats. Pacemaker, Viking, Egg Harbor(a Leek family boat), Ocean(a Leek family boat), Post, Silverton and Luhrs(now the same company with different names) all came from the area. Some gone and others struggling with Viking the only strong name left.

Ship
02-19-2009, 07:41 PM
Blankendingy,
You didn't get my drift: I was one of the last wooden boat butchers in the business in the Daytona area and have seen plenty of different problems in both boats I've repaired and those I surveyed for banks and insurance companies (yeah, been there and done that too). In fact, I first helped my father build a wood boat in 1952 and have been going at it ever since. And there's nothing like the feel of a piece of well sanded and treated wood in my hands. And yes, water intruding into the laminate causes blisters and at its worse, separation which is what causes sinking (not blistering).

For wooden boat afficiandos that want to and are CAPABLE of working with wood, old wood boats are fine. However, for the 99.9% of the boating public that barely know the pointy end from the blunt end, wood boats are an anthema and are to be avoided at all costs, even for those that can well afford them. As I said, I'm at the point in my life where with what time I've got left, I want to spend it out in the boat and not laid up in some boatyard working on it.
Like I said, you don't want a wooden boat. I and some other people like me, like working on boats,wood and fiberglass. This thread started out about a fiberglass and wood boat. It still is. Tell the man the pros and the cons as you see them. I will.

proequipco
02-19-2009, 09:56 PM
OK, Ok, I know it isn't a shammie, but I have come across a pretty decent deal on a 1977 33' Egg Harbor. For my current lifestyle here in the northeast with my wife and kid, it seems like a great boat for us. Its all about the cabin space and the cockpit. Am looking at and tempted to buy another 26, but the size of the cabin just doesn't cut it. Anybody familiar with this particular model of Egg?

scoffshore,

Check out:

http://eggharborowners.org/

It is like a parallel universe to FTC, except for Egg owners.

I don't know if this is the same Egg you are looking at:

http://www.yachtworld.com/boats/1972/Egg-Harbor-Convertible-1985209/Charleston/SC/United-States

But I looked at this one just before I bought my 22' Stalker this month.

Don't be put off by some of the posts regarding wood in boats. The 33 Egg is a fiberglass hull with wooden decks and superstructure. They were extremely overbuilt in the fiberglass department and the wood work is top notch. There are few blistering problems associated with the early Eggs (completely neglected boats aside)

It all comes down to what you want out of a boat. If you want to use her as a weekend home and localized cruising, these boats will be perfect. If you think you are going to restore one to a showpiece, look for one that someone has already done (it will be cheaper in the long run).

With a boat having a fair amount of wood (potential for problems if not maintained) you need to know your end game. If everything goes south, know when to walk away (IE. how many dumpsters will it take). I hate to be blunt, but you don't owe anybody anything. Old Eggs are nice, but no one is going to pay your bills for you. If you start chasing problems, the boat will quickly consume you.

Just my 2 cents from a fair amount of experience of owning several wooden boats, one of which was an 83ft. motor yacht. (another story for another time)

Hope some of this has helped,
Vince

scoffshore
02-19-2009, 10:36 PM
Thanks for the info, Not the one, but I saw that one this evening. I have probably walked right past that particular boat before.

As for wooden boats, I actually love them. I actually have a few stations for a 30' center cockpit cuddy up on the wall of my shop that I was going to build before the market went south. I spent way too much time on my 1969 Wooden Grand Banks, and enjoyed her, but when I got her she was too far gone for the amount of time I had to put into her.

oldmako
02-19-2009, 11:59 PM
Where ever the glass on wood is in any boat, it's a problem. It traps fresh water near the wood. A lesson we all need to be aware of:frown:

True if the boat was not built properly, but with modern techniques (well, not so modern actually) and quality epoxies, I'd take a wood hulled boat any day. Wood can be an outstanding boat building material. Just take a look at the Oregon Inlet fleet.

Capt Crunch
02-20-2009, 06:52 AM
Doesn't Morning Wood have an Egg? Jim, you out there?

Ship
02-20-2009, 10:46 AM
True if the boat was not built properly, but with modern techniques (well, not so modern actually) and quality epoxies, I'd take a wood hulled boat any day. Wood can be an outstanding boat building material. Just take a look at the Oregon Inlet fleet.
I would agree. It's more about construction and maintance than about medium. I have to agree with AndyB, There is more and considerably more maintance on wood. On the other side, there's the ride, lack of noise, ease of replacement/alteration and the biggest factor to me the LOOKS. Wood looks way better than glass. IMHO

tiburon
02-20-2009, 03:58 PM
Scoffshore, no question the older 33 Eggs are gorgeous, well built, sea kindly boats. That said, any boat that age even one well cared for is going to be a hand full. I speak from experience. If the boat has not been repowered and fuel tanks replaced within the last 5 years this will be an expensive uphill battle on the machinery side alone. If this boat has the glass hull with wood house be prepared to start replacing wood no matter how well maintained. Many of these boats came with Chrysler 360s which were great when they were new, and keep in mind the engines are located below the salon deck. I can't count the number of times I moved chairs on to the back deck, rolled up the carpet, and moved the sofa from side to side to gain access to the engines. Make sure your marina has a pool because your family will be displaced while the engine hatches open. If you are looking for a weekend condo in this size range check out the Trojan F32. It has a better layout with the gally and dinette down giving you more room in the salon and prices start in the 20s for the older boats. Either way, not a good idea. Sorry.

morning wood
02-20-2009, 04:57 PM
My family has owned Egg Harbors all my life. I currently own a 43Egg S/F Wood. I owned a 37Egg S/F wood before that. My brother owns a 33 glass Egg 1979.
My father has a 44 S/F Pacemaker wood.I have rebuilt and restored Egg Harbors for many people. Eggs are my favorites. David Martin,Phil Bolger,and George Stadel were the designers. They didn't build ugly boats.Well with the exception of Bolger. Shamrocks didn't build ugly boats.
The bottom Line....
Like Shamrocks they are not the best performers, and there are boats with a lot more room for their size. But when you pull in a marina everybody says Wow!!! "Now that is a boat".
All the boats mentioned have great qualities.as sheer beauty and lines Eggs and Shamrocks are hard to beat. But as far as rot goes there is NOT a boat on the planet in wood that you can't find rot,or problems with electrolysis etc. Even constant proffesionally maintained Ryboviches,Merritts, have wood problems. Trumpys too. Just did help put a window corner in a Rybovich. We keep our boats in sheds year round. That is the only way to stay with them and keep them right. And I still have plenty of scarfs in my Egg. I sleep with sandpaper and a brush.
Back to your Egg. The wood house Eggs have rot in them No question. But they are easier to repair than the all glass vesion built after 1978. We had to gut the wheelhouse in the 79 Egg due to rot in everything. Floor,cockpit timbers,window and house frames. 73 to 77 Egg built a glass boat with a wood topsides. 78 on they were all glass. Please PM me and I will forward my phone number and we can talk. I will be more than happy to answer your questions and help you out.

scoffshore
02-20-2009, 08:10 PM
Morning Wood, PM sent