PH recoring

Discussion in 'Tips & Modifications' started by Deacon, Aug 10, 2017.

  1. Deacon

    Deacon Member

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    Jun 28, 2017
    I'm new to the forum (first post) and hoping I can get some assistance. By the way, I greatly appreciate all the knowledge shared here as I've learned a great deal already from reading. So, on with the story... I'm bringing back to life a 20' PH as a restoration for my son. Motor work is substantially complete and she runs great, replacing non-functional trim with new Bennett system, rewiring birdnest in process, bilge adjustments, etc, etc, but in the meantime my focus is on stabilizing the pilothouse.

    Prior owner must have uninstalled rigging from the top, leaving holes exposed and now I have some free mulch chips for anyone who wants it.

    So, since I'd like to mount rod holders to the aft section of the pilothouse, I feel like I should recore rather than just carve out a section and back it to avoid unnecessary flex.

    There's obviously a gap between the glass below and the heavier top glass where the core was. I'm thinking I grind out the glass below, assess core width necessary (perhaps 3/4") possibly leaving a lip of original glass around the aft and side edges, mix up some thickened epoxy into the corners and top (with a nice drop cloth beneath), wet out the new core and either replace with old cut out glass or just redo with new glass.

    I'm looking for some advice on how any experienced folks would go about it and what you would use as core material.

    Whole lot of stuff to feed on right there... hoping for some feedback. Thank you all in advance for taking the time to think about it.

    Deacon
     
  2. Deacon

    Deacon Member

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    Jun 28, 2017
  3. lwarden

    lwarden Well-Known Member

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    Jun 2, 2011
    San Diego
    Pictures aren't coming up for me. You can upload them directly.
     
  4. Deacon

    Deacon Member

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    Jun 28, 2017
    Thanks... thought photobucket would work better. I attached a few, with the first being the aft section of my swiss cheese hardtop on the pilothouse. Pilothouse Top.png Beauty on the outside... but.JPG Cleaned up, finally.JPG Future Captain.JPG
     
  5. Deacon

    Deacon Member

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    Jun 28, 2017
    Still need to recore. Just planning on some well-dried treated ply, sealed with epoxy. Suppose I could use honeycomb or other, but I'll just get it done... just rocket launcher mounted to it and no threat of water intrusion any longer. In the meantime, a fun picture. Fun redfish trip to the gulf... boat handled great.

    [​IMG]
     
  6. Gary S

    Gary S Well-Known Member

    A big no on the treated ply,you will not get a good bond. Use regular ply treated with either Rot doctor CPES- https://www.rotdoctor.com/index.cfm?path=products/product.html&&stoken=rSMiiRB3IIKiQMy1vkY8VSLR2jO9xZCglYnjI7r0lepgQGFWTnQluRX/P+Mj9zg4&ret2=https://www.rotdoctor.com/index.cfm?path=products/product.html& or Smiths CPES, http://www.smithandcompany.org/CPES/
    Keep putting it on until it soaks up no more.Then lay it up with epoxy. Whenever you drill a hole through your treated wood you should soak it again with the cpes
     
  7. Deacon

    Deacon Member

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    Jun 28, 2017
    Thanks Gary. Hoping someone would chime in. I'll go in that direction or just order some marine ply... needed some anyway for another venture. Thanks for steering me away. I'll drill and fill with epoxy where I attach.
     
  8. Power

    Power Well-Known Member Supporting Captain

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    Sep 5, 2011
    Puyallup, WA
    Just recored some section of my roof with Coosa board. Crazy expensive, but there is no worry about rot ever again. Lot's of folks use it for replacing their transoms.

    IMG_2734.jpg IMG_2734.jpg IMG_2751.jpg IMG_2751.jpg
     

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  9. Ship

    Ship Well-Known Member

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    Dec 15, 2008
    Atlantic City, NJ area
    I would recore with the Corsa. The least amount of weight up high, the better. I would cut from the top and reglass the plug you cut out. That way you are working down not up. Lots easier and if you don't do the best glass work like me, you don't see it as much as you would if from the bottom. Also it's a lot easier to sand and finish outside corners than inside corners.
     
  10. Power

    Power Well-Known Member Supporting Captain

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    Sep 5, 2011
    Puyallup, WA
    You got that right. It’s a lot easier from top down most of the time. With this project I was worried about keeping the “curve” in the roof. If I cut a section of the roof off I would have trouble matching the roofs curve. The bottom skin of glass was to flimsy to use as a mold. I bought those extending poles at Harbor Freight and it made all the difference! Replaced in sections with a good layer of thickened epoxy to fill any voids. And covered the seams with a heavy glass. I’m thinking it’s more stout than the original.
     

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